This report describes the progress made by the Integrated Ecosystem Model (IEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada Project for the full duration of the project (September 1, 2011 through August 31, 2016).

Funded Title: 
Differential Effects of Climate-Mediated Forest Change on the Habitats of Two Ungulates Important to Subsistence and Sport Hunting Economies
Location: 
Alaska and Northwest Canada
Duration: 
April 1, 2015 to April 1, 2016

Climate change is a complex process that may affect the food resources of different species of wildlife in contrasting ways. Moose and caribou are important to both subsistence and sport hunting economies throughout Alaska, but their winter diets are quite different; caribou focus on snow covered ground hugging lichens while moose focus on the twigs of erect deciduous shrubs that protrude above the snow.

This report describes the progress of the IEM project from January 1, 2013 through August 31, 2014, and specifically reports on new data products developed during this time period. Categories of data products include climate, land cover, soil properties (including permafrost), fire disturbance, treeline and vegetation dynamics, plant productivity, and carbon storage.

Members of the Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska and Northwest Canada recently published an article in the journal, Alaska Park Science. The special issue was aimed at understanding climate change in Alaska’s National Parks. The article provides a description of the IEM project and the integrated ecosystem model, in addition to outlining project progress and uses for the model outputs.

For the Alaska Climate Science Center (AK CSC), 2012 was a year of continued growth and further development of our research capacity and outreach activities. In this 2011-2012 annual highlights issue for the AK CSC, you will learn about new investments in research capacity to support high-performance simulation modeling activities, as well as providing state-of-the-art radar equipment to observe and document glacier dynamics.

In this project we are developing, testing, and applying the Integrated Ecosystem Model (IEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada to forecast how landscape structure and function might change in response to how climate change influences interactions among disturbance regimes, permafrost integrity, hydrology, vegetation succession, and vegetation migration.

"Carbon Balance and Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Positive and Negative Feedbacks from Permafrost Thaw" is a presentation by Mark Waldrop, USGS and coauthors Jack McFarland, 

"Arctic Land-Surface Temperatures Increasing from 2000-2012 Derived by MODIS Sensors on NASA Earth Observing Satellites" was a poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2012 Meeting in San Francisco, California.

 

"Modeling the effects of fire severity on soil organic horizons and forest composition in Interior Alaska" is a poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2012 Meeting in San Francisco, California. The poster authors are Genet, H.; Barrett, K.; 

"Dynamic Model Coupling" is a poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2012 Meeting in San Francisco, California.

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