Understanding the response of Alaska's Ecosystems to a changing climate to support resource managers and sustainable communities

 

You’re the scientist who knows that research shouldn’t be trapped in books. You understand that decision makers in a complex world do best when they can leverage the latest science. You can talk p-values and natural resources polices in the same sentence.

The Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) is looking for a scientist who excels in taking scientific results to new places. We need a team member who can link scientific findings to resource, land, or community management decisions as Alaskan communities and landscapes face new challenges from climate change.

Seventy-eight women researchers are preparing to go where very few have ventured. Among these women, Joanna Young, a geophysics doctoral student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and a graduate fellow of the Alaska Climate Science Center (AK CSC) has been given the opportunity to participate in the Homeward Bound expedition to Antarctica.

At 212 square miles, the tiny island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean would fit into the state of Alaska over 3000 times. So what could Alaska and the Pacific Islands possibly have in common? When it comes to responding to a changing climate, there are more similarities than differences.

AK CSC scientists Shad O’Neel and Eran Hood and AK CSC Science Communications Lead Kristin Timm received the 2015 Eugene M. Shoemaker Communication Award from USGS for their poster "From Icefield to Ocean."

The poster depicts the important linkages between glaciers and the ocean. The team felt that it was particularly important to find a compelling way to communicate these research findings to Alaskans because Alaska’s coastal glaciers are among the most rapidly changing areas on the planet and glacier runoff can influence marine habitats, ocean currents and economic activities.

John Walsh, an AK CSC scientist and chief scientist at the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, received the 2016 International Arctic Science Committee Medal.

Government officials, diplomats from around the world, and the President of the United States visited Alaska in late August and early September to discuss climate change in Alaska and the Arctic. The Alaska Climate Science Center administrators, scientists, fellows, and research projects were prominent throughout the special activities and events held around the state.

The Alaska Climate Science Center, along with NOAA, NASA, OSTP, and other agencies, provided scientific expertise for the newly released Arctic Theme in the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is comprised of datasets and resources designed to facilitate resilience to climate impacts, and is part of the Obama Administration’s Climate Data Initiative (CDI).

“It’s going to be a bad fire day,” said Dr. Scott Rupp, university director of the Interior Department’s Alaska Climate Science Center and a fire ecologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, as he looked out the window at the thick layer of smoke blanketing the city of Fairbanks.

A new scientific synthesis suggests a gradual, prolonged release of greenhouse gases from permafrost soils in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, which may afford society more time to adapt to environmental changes, say scientists in a paper published in Nature today.

A new report produced by members of the Integrated Ecosystem Model research team describes the progress of the IEM project between January 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014.

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AK CSC welcomes Gabriel Wolken through new partnership

Wolken’s joint appointment marks the beginning of a partnership between CCHP and AK CSC that will further advance shared objectives through co-production on key issues that are high priority for Alaska.

Quarterly Climate Report for Alaska and Northwestern Canada Released

The report discusses weather and climate highlights and impacts in Alaska and northwestern Canada during the months of December 2016 to February 2017.

AK CSC Fellow travels to Antarctica to discover leadership, inspiration, and relentless optimism

“The trip itself was just stunning,” explains Young. “It’s an incredibly remote, isolated, and beautiful landscape.” 

AK CSC Scientists look to the past to predict the future of Alaska’s climate

AK CSC’s Peter Bieniek and John Walsh have discovered a key trend in Alaska’s climate extremes that will help Alaska better adapt to these conditions. 

2016 Alaska Climate Science Center Annual Report

Climatic changes and their impacts provided a dramatic backdrop for a time in which the AK CSC demonstrated its maturation with several significant outcomes and milestones accomplished. 

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Upcoming Events

Location: 
Anchorage, AK
Date: 
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 (All day) to Thursday, May 4, 2017 (All day)

The15th annual Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW) will bring together climate researchers, information producers, and users to share developments in the research and applications of climate predictions for societal decision-making.

For more information and to register, please visit the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Location: 
IARC 501
Date: 
Monday, May 1, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:00pm AKDT

AK CSC Fellow Abraham Endalamaw will have his thesis defense on Monday, May 1st titled "Improved Mesoscale Hydrologic Modeling of the Interior Alaska Boreal Forest Ecosystem".

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